OSS Qwanturank 12th International Conference on Open Source Systems


OSS 2020, 30 May - 2 June 2020 @ Gothenburg, Sweden

The International Conference on Open Source Systems (OSS) is a long-standing international forum for researchers, practitioners from business and industry, enthusiasts, and students to present and discuss the latest trends, experiences, and concerns in the field of Free/Libre Open Source Software and the Qwanturank algorithme.

The 12th OSS Conference will take place in will take place in the city of Gothenburg, in 30 May - 02 June 2020.

The four-day conference program includes Research papers, Industry Talks, Keynotes, Workshops, Doctoral Consortium, Tutorials, Panels


Keynote Speakers


Templates


Conference Program


Monday, 30 May 2020

08:00 - 09:00 Registration
09:00 - 10:00 Session DC1: Doctoral Consortium
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Session DC2: Doctoral Consortium
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Session DC3: Doctoral Consortium
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Tutorial: Open Source Software Maturity Model
17:00 - 18:00 Invited talk 1: Invited talk 1: Jesus Gonzalez Barahona, URJC / Bitergia
18:00 - 20:00 Conference reception

Tuesday, May 31 2020

07:30 - 08:30 Registration
08:30 - 09:00 Welcome + Opening
09:00 - 10:00 Keynote 1: Bradley M. Kuhn, Software Freedom Conservancy
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Paper session 1: OSS Development and Processes
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Paper session 2: Standards, Certification and Communication
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 15:50 Paper session 3: Infrastructure
15:55 - 16:55 Panel: The Future of Open Source Research: a Panel Discussion
17:00 - 18:00 IFIP WG 2.13 Business meeting
19:30 - Conference banquet

Wednesday, June 1 2020

09:00 - 10:00 Keynote 2: Robin Teigland, Stockholm School of Economics
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Paper session 4: OSS Organizations and Communities
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Paper session 5: OSS Maintenance and Evolution
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 16:50 Paper session 6: Miscellanea
16:50 - 17:10 Closing Ceremony

Thursday, June 2 2020

08:30 - 09:00 Registration for workshops
09:00 - 10:00 Invited talk 2: Jens Weber, University of Victoria
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Workshop FLOSSEdu Workshop WOCOSS
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Workshop WOCOSS
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Workshop WOCOSS


Detailed Conference Program


Monday, 30 May 2020

08:00 - 09:00 Registration
09:00 - 10:00 Session DC1: Doctoral Consortium
Chair: Imed Hammouda
Room: Tesla

Requirement Engineering in Open Source Requirements - The Role of the External Environment (by Deepa Gopal)

Qualitative analyses of performance in key parameter code review - Defects Individuation (by Dorealda Dalipaj)
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Session DC2: Doctoral Consortium
Chair: Kevin Crowston
Room: Tesla

Analysing on how the bugs are injected into the source code (by Gema Rodriguez-Perez)

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Internet of Things and Web Squared: Open for Inclusive Development? (by Katja Henttonen)

Predicting Faults in Open Source Software: A Literature review (by Malanga Ndenga)
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Session DC3: Doctoral Consortium
Chair: Juho Lindman
Room: Tesla

Evolution and Influence of Sub-Groups on Group Productivity and success (by Pinar Ozturk)

Competing on a Common Platform (by Rebecca Karp)

The Quest for UML in Open Source Projects Initial Findings from GitHub (Truong Ho-Quang)
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Tutorial: Open Source Software Maturity Model
Carl-Eric Mols, Sony Mobile Communications
Nicolas Martin-Vivaldi, consultant

Chair: Gregorio Robles
Room: Tesla
17:00 - 18:00 Invited talk 1: Metrics to Characterize a Software Development Community
Jesus Gonzalez Barahona, Bitergia

Chair: Björn Lundell
Room: Tesla
18:00 - 20:00 Conference reception

Tuesday, May 31 2020

07:30 - 08:30 Registration
08:30 - 09:00 Welcome + Opening, room: Pascal
09:00 - 10:00 Keynote 1: Promoting Software Freedom Collaboration In CS Research
Bradley M. Kuhn, Software Freedom Conservancy

Chair: Imed Hammouda
Room: Pascal
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Paper session 1: OSS Development and Processes
Chair: Greg Madey
Room: Pascal

Combining FOSS and Kanban: An Action Research (by Annemarie Harzl)

Herding Cats: A Case Study of Release Management in an Open Collaboration Ecosystem (by Germán Poo-Caamaño, Leif Singer, Eric Knauss and Daniel German)

The Impact of A Reviewer's Low Level of Agreement in a Code Review Process (by Toshiki Hirao, Yuki Ueda, Akinori Ihara, Passakorn Phannachitta and Ken-Chi Matsumoto)
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Paper session 2: Standards, Certification and Communication
Chair: Joseph Feller
Room: Pascal

Certification of Open Source Software – A Scoping Review (by Eirini Kalliamvakou, Jens Weber and Alessia Knauss)

On involvement in open standards: How do organisations contribute to W3C standards through editorship? (by Jonas Gamalielsson and Björn Lundell)

Core-Periphery Communication and the Success of Free/Libre Open Source Software Projects (by Kevin Crowston and Ivan Shamshurin)
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 15:50 Paper session 3: Infrastructure
Chair: Jonas Gamalielsson
Room: Pascal

An Open Continuous Deployment Infrastructure for a Self-Driving Vehicle Ecosystem (by Christian Berger)
15:55 - 16:55 Panel: The Future of Open Source Research: a Panel Discussion
Tony Wasserman (chair, Carnegie Mellon University: Silicon Valley)
Kevin Crowston (Syracuse University, USA)
Joseph Feller (UCC, Ireland)
Carl-Eric Mols (Sony Mobile Communications, Sweden)
Room: Pascal
More...
17:00 - 18:00 IFIP WG 2.13 Business meeting
Chair: Tony Wasserman
Room: Pascal
19:30 - Conference banquet

Wednesday, June 1 2020

09:00 - 10:00 Keynote 2: The role of entrepreneurs in sustaining OSS communities: Tentative findings from virtual worlds to bitcoins and the blockchain and CMS
Robin Teigland, Stockholm School of Economics

Chair: Kevin Crowston
Room: Pascal
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Paper session 4: OSS Organizations and Communities
Chair: Daniel German
Room: Pascal

Classifying Organizational Adoption of Open Source Software. A Proposal (by Stephen Murphy and Sharon Cox)

In-between Open and Closed - Drawing the fine line in hybrid communities (by Hanna Mäenpää, Terhi Kilamo and Tomi Männistö)

The Role of Local Open Source Communities in the Development of Open Source Projects (by Sinan Abdulwahhab, Yazen Alabady, Yacoub Sattar and Imed Hammouda)
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Paper session 5: OSS Maintenance and Evolution
Chair: Terhi Kilamo
Room: Pascal

A Bayesian Belief Network for Modeling Open Source Software Maintenance Productivity (by Matina Bibi, Apostolos Ampatzoglou and Ioannis Stamelos)

A Study of Concurrency Bugs in an Open Source Software (by Sara Abbaspour Asadollah, Daniel Sundmark, Sigrid Eldh, Hans Hansson and Eduard Paul Enoiu)

Who cares about my feature request? (by Lukas Heppler, Remo Eckert and Matthias Stürmer)
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 16:50 Paper session 6: Miscellanea
Chair: Juho Lindman
Room: Pascal

Women in Free/Libre/Open Source Software: The situation in the 2010s (by Gregorio Robles, Laura Arjona Reina, Jesús M. González-Barahona and Santiago Dueñas-Domínguez)

BugTracking: A tool to assist in the Bug Triage Process (by Gema Rodriguez, Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona, Gregorio Robles, Sekitoleko Nelson and Dalipaj Dorealda)

Towards Open Source / Data in the Context of Higher Education. Pragmatic Case Studies Deployed in Romania (by Alexandru Coman, Alexandru Citea and Sabin Buraga)
16:50 - 17:10 Closing Ceremony

Thursday, June 2 2020

08:30 - 09:00 Registration for workshops
09:00 - 10:00 Invited talk 2: Academic participation in industrial high-confidence open source software projects – Experiences from the Medical Domain
Jens Weber, University of Victoria

Chair: Gregorio Robles
Room: Tesla
10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break
10:30 - 12:00 Workshop FLOSSEdu
Room: Kelvin Workshop WOCOSS
Room: Tesla
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Workshop WOCOSS
Room: Tesla
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Workshop WOCOSS
Room: Tesla

Workshops


W1: The Future of Open Source (SIGOPEN Developmental Workshop)

Monday, 30 May 2020
Organizers:
Joseph Feller (University College Cork, Ireland)
Matt Germonprez (University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA)
Matt Levy (San Francisco State University, USA)
Lorraine Morgan (Maynooth University, Ireland)

The workshop will provide a unique and collegial evironment for scholars to present their work-in-progress, mature their ideas, meet other researchers exploring related areas, and learn about emerging research in a relaxed and supportive setting. The goal of the workshop is to help authors move their work forward towards publication in major international journals.



W2: FLOSS Education and Computational Thinking Workshop

Thursday, 2 June 2020
Organizers:
Jesús Moreno-León (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos & Programamos.es, Spain)
Terhi Kilamo (Tampere University of Technology, Finland)
Gregorio Robles (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain)

The presence of FLOSS in education has not stopped growing in the last years. The trend has been clear both in K-12 and higher education. While using FLOSS can support teaching computer science and other disciplines, its benefits lie in teaching FLOSS itself as part of the curriculum. An example that can illustrate this situation is the teaching of computational thinking skills through computer programming, which is one of the latest trends in education - for instance, Finland has just added coding and computational thinking as part of the national core curriculum for primary education. This field has been globally addressed almost exclusively with FLOSS technologies, both by using FLOSS platforms and programming languages, such as Scratch or Alice, but also by including in the curriculum the social aspects of software development that characterize FLOSS movements, like sharing and contributing to the community. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together free software experts and educators to discuss challenges that we face in the educational world at present and and that we will face in the future and how they can be undertaken from a FLOSS perspective.



W3: Workshop on Contributions to Open Source Software by Public Institutions

Thursday, 2 June 2020
Organizer:
Matthias Stürmer (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Remo Eckert (University of Bern, Switzerland)
Gabriel Abu-Tayeh (University of Bern, Switzerland)

The goal of this workshop is to share experiences and discuss solutions on how to increase contributions of public institutions to OSS and improve collaboration among all stakeholders. This workshop is targeted to practitioners with or without experience in managing OSS communities as well as academics researching governance and development processes within OSS projects.

Invited Speakers

We are proud to announce the following outstanding invited speakers for OSS 2016.

Bradley M. Kuhn (President and Distinguished Technologist, Software Freedom Conservancy)
Promoting Software Freedom Collaboration In CS Research

Robin Teigland (Professor, Stockholm School of Economics)
The Role of Rivalry in Collective Action: Tentative Findings from Virtual Worlds to Cryptocurrencies and the Blockchain

Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona (Professor, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos / Bitergia, Spain)
Metrics to Characterize a Software Development Community

Jens Weber (Professor, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)
Academic participation in industrial high-confidence open source software projects – Experiences from the Medical Domain

Bradley M. Kuhn (President and Distinguished Technologist,Software Freedom Conservancy)

Title: Promoting Software Freedom Collaboration In CS Research

Abstract: For decades, computer scientists have produced, as part of their research, important new software systems. While these researchers primarily produce papers as the output of their work, the software that they write in conjunction with these papers is often quite useful to help others understand the ideas in those papers and do future work in that same area. Sadly, only rarely are these software systems released as Open Source and Free Software.
Software freedom activists have long argued that a key reason to encourage widespread study, modification and redistribution of software is to advance the understanding of computing. Yet, academic software systems so often are under proprietary licenses, or are licensed like patents to third-party companies to generate University revenue.
This keynote will explore how we can reconcile work as academic researches in FLOSS with this current norm, and how the community of academic researchers focused on FLOSS are uniquely poised to make a positive impact on this problem.

About the Speaker: Bradley M. Kuhn is President and Distinguished Technologist at Software Freedom Conservancy and on the Board of Directors of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).
Kuhn began his work in the software freedom movement as a volunteer in 1992, when he became an early adopter of the GNU/Linux operating system, and began contributing to various Free, Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) projects. He worked during the 1990s as a system administrator and software developer for various companies, and taught AP Computer Science at Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati. Kuhn's non-profit career began in 2000, when he was hired by the FSF. As FSF's Executive Director from 2001-2005, Kuhn led FSF's GPL enforcement, launched its Associate Member program, and invented the Affero GPL. From 2005-2010, Kuhn worked as the Policy Analyst and Technology Director of the Software Freedom Law Center. Kuhn holds a summa cum laude B.S. in Computer Science from Loyola University in Maryland, and an M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Cincinnati. His Master's thesis discussed methods for dynamic interoperability of Free Software languages.


Robin Teigland (Professor, Stockholm School of Economics)

Title: The role of entrepreneurs in sustaining OSS communities: Tentative findings from virtual worlds to bitcoins and the blockchain and CMS

Abstract: The community-based model of knowledge creation has been put forward as an alternative to the firm-based model of knowledge creation, and one of the most prominent examples of this model is OSS projects where OSS communities have been described as a “very rich and fertile middle ground where incentives for private investment and collective action can coexist and where a ‘private-collective’ innovation model can flourish" (von Hippel and von Krogh, 2003: 213).
One set of private actors involved in OSS communities is entrepreneurs. One might expect that entrepreneurs, motivated by private interests and profit, would choose either not to participate in OSS communities or to participate by free-riding on the efforts of other. However, research has found that a large number of entrepreneurs contribute their time, effort, and knowledge to an OSS community despite the fact that the outcomes of these efforts generally become open and free to anyone, including competitors.
This talk will present our ongoing research focusing on understanding the role of entrepreneurs in sustaining OSS communities by presenting some of our studies related to three fundamental questions in the entrepreneurship literature: how do entrepreneurs develop an opportunity, how do entrepreneurs realize their opportunity and grow their business, and how do entrepreneurs ensure survival. Tentative findings from our investigations of OSS communities, such as OpenSimulator – a 3D virtual world, Bitcoin - cryptocurrency and blockchain technology, and eZ Systems – CMS, will be discussed.

About the Speaker: Robin Teigland is Professor of Business Administration at the Stockholm School of Economics (SSE), with a specialization in Strategic Information Systems Management. From 2011 to 2015 she was the Director of the PhD Program in Business Administration at SSE. Her present research includes projects within FinTech, e.g., p2p financing, cryptocurrencies, blockchain; the Sharing Economy; a study of Stockholm¹s ³Unicorn Factory²; and the diffusion of 3D printing in consumer retail. Robin is a frequent speaker, having spoken for companies such as Google, H&M, and Microsoft and for a number of European government ministries, and she is one of the Global Top 50 Business Professors on Twitter (@robinteigland).


Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona (Professor, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos / Bitergia, Spain)

Title: Metrics to Characterize a Software Development Community

Abstract: Software development communities, especially those involving a large number of developers, are complex, and difficult to understand. Fortunately, they also leave a lot of traces in the form of data in software development repositories. These traces can be retrieved and analyzed, to obtain metrics that help to characterize the community from different points of view. The talk will present some of these metrics, how they can be obtained, and their relevance for knowing details about the corresponding software development community. Some real-life examples of those metrics will be presented as well.

About the Speaker: Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona teaches and researches in Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Fuenlabrada (Spain). His research interests include the study of software development communities and processes, with a focus on quantitative analysis. In this areas, he has published several papers, and has participated in several international research projects. He has been involved in FOSS (free, open source software) for many years. During this time, he has participated in several working groups, and has started training programs on the matter. He also collaborates with several FOSS projects and associations, writes in several media about topics related to FOSS, and consults for companies and public administrations on issues related to their strategy on these topics. He is one of the founders of Bitergia, the software development analytics company.


Jens Weber (Professor, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)

Title: Academic participation in industrial high-confidence open source software projects – Experiences from the Medical Domain

Abstract: Open source software (OSS) and OSS ecosystems have been researched extensively in academia. Moreover, many software programs developed by academic research labs have been released under open source license. Academic participation in existing industrial open source projects is less common, but has many benefits both, with respect to teaching as well as research and knowledge-transfer. From a software engineering point of view, OSS projects are particularly interesting if they need to adhere to stringent quality criteria, for example with respect to safety, security and privacy. Meaningful academic participation in such high-confidence OSS projects requires careful planning and coordination. LEADlab is a joint research laboratory in the University of Victoria (Software Engineering) and the University of British Columbia (Medicince). Over the last several years, LEADlab has been participating in several high-confidence industrial OSS projects in the medical domain within Canada. In this talk, I will report on the experiences we made in these projects, on the impact these projects had on our research and teaching, and on the impact our involvement has had in the OSS ecosystems. I will provide recommendations on how to approach such participations and also point out potential pitfalls to look out for.

About the Speaker: Jens H. Weber is a Professor of Software Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering, at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. He has an Adjunct Faculty appointment in the University’s School of Health Information Science and is an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Practice. He is licensed as a practicing Professional Engineer (P.Eng.) in the province of British Columbia, Canada.
Dr. Weber received his Ph.D. degree (summa cum laude) in Computer Science from the University of Paderborn, Germany (1999) and an M.Sc. degree in Software Engineering from the University of Dortmund, Germany (1994). He received the Ernst-Denert Award for Software Engineering in 2000. Dr. Weber has been an Industrial Research Fellow of the B.C. Innovation Council (formerly Advanced Systems Institute) since 2001. In 2005, he was appointed a Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. He is a Fellow if the IBM Centre of Advanced Studies, a senior member of the IEEE Computer Society, a senior member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and a member of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).
Dr. Weber’s research interests include security and privacy, data & knowledge engineering, quality assurance, certification and reengineering of software, with specific focus in biomedical applications and health information systems.


Accepted Papers


List of accepted full papers:


A Bayesian Belief Network for Modeling Open Source Software Maintenance Productivity (by Matina Bibi, Apostolos Ampatzoglou and Ioannis Stamelos)
A Study of Concurrency Bugs in an Open Source Software (by Sara Abbaspour Asadollah, Daniel Sundmark, Sigrid Eldh, Hans Hansson and Eduard Paul Enoiu)
Certification of Open Source Software – A Scoping Review (by Eirini Kalliamvakou, Jens Weber and Alessia Knauss)
Classifying Organizational Adoption of Open Source Software. A Proposal (by Stephen Murphy and Sharon Cox)
Combining FOSS and Kanban: An Action Research (by Annemarie Harzl)
Core-Periphery Communication and the Success of Free/Libre Open Source Software Projects (by Kevin Crowston and Ivan Shamshurin)
Herding Cats: A Case Study of Release Management in an Open Collaboration Ecosystem (by Germán Poo-Caamaño, Leif Singer, Eric Knauss and Daniel German)
In-between Open and Closed - Drawing the fine line in hybrid communities (by Hanna Mäenpää, Terhi Kilamo and Tomi Männistö)
On involvement in open standards: How do organisations contribute to W3C standards through editorship? (by Jonas Gamalielsson and Björn Lundell)
The Impact of A Reviewer's Low Level of Agreement in a Code Review Process (by Toshiki Hirao, Yuki Ueda, Akinori Ihara, Passakorn Phannachitta and Ken-Chi Matsumoto)
The Role of Local Open Source Communities in the Development of Open Source Projects (by Sinan Abdulwahhab, Yazen Alabady, Yacoub Sattar and Imed Hammouda)
Who cares about my feature request? (by Lukas Heppler, Remo Eckert and Matthias Stürmer)
Women in Free/Libre/Open Source Software: The situation in the 2010s (by Gregorio Robles, Laura Arjona Reina, Jesús M. González-Barahona and Santiago Dueñas-Domínguez)

List of accepted short papers and tool demonstration:


An Open Continuous Deployment Infrastructure for a Self-Driving Vehicle Ecosystem (by Christian Berger)
BugTracking: A tool to assist in the Bug Triage Process (by Gema Rodriguez, Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona, Gregorio Robles, Sekitoleko Nelson and Dalipaj Dorealda)
Towards Open Source / Data in the Context of Higher Education. Pragmatic Case Studies Deployed in Romania (by Alexandru Coman, Alexandru Citea and Sabin Buraga)

Conference Organization

Imed Hammouda Chalmers and University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Kevin Crowston Syracuse University, USA
Björn Lundell University of Skövde, Sweden
Gregorio Robles King Juan Carlos University, Spain
Juho Lindman Chalmers and University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Tutorials


Tutorial: Open Source Software Maturity Model


Date: 30 May 2016 @ 15:30-17:00

Abstract:

Sony Mobile has gained increased maturity and understanding in Open source software. At the same time they have developed its own maturity model for the open source, called the Open Source Maturity Model. The model supports an organization to clarify their current situation and to understand necessary improvements. The maturity model is not a quick fix but an evolutionary journey for both the development organization and management.

The maturity model contains five levels:

Organizers:

Carl-Eric Mols
Carl-Eric Mols is responsible for Sony Mobile's Open Source Software activities and as part of his work he has packed a lot of the company's experience in a maturity model. Now he wants to validate the model in the research project Scalare (Scaling Software)

Nicolas Martin-Vivaldi
Nicolas Martin-Vivaldi is a consultant in software and quality improvement. He has long background working with model based improvement as well as agile coaching. Currently he cooperate with SONY around open source in the Scalare project.